Weekly Reads

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Candace- Female Executions:Martyrs, Murderesses, and Madwomen

Christine-The Public Library:A Photographic Essay

Shianne- The Ghost in the Tokaido Inn

 

Don’t Even Think About It

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dont even think about it

Don’t Even Think About It

by: Sarah Mlynowski

The cover description sounds cheesy, a homeroom of high school sophomore aged teens obtaining telepathic powers from their annual flu shot. Despite the premise, the story was handled really well. The thoughts of 22 students were networked into one ‘hive mind’ but their personalities were kept intact. It was not hard to understand who was talking/thinking or who each character was. Some of the students’ stories were delved into more than others- handling mature issues such as cheating, family values, courage, and what it means to work as a team. This book was a speedy read with short chapters that  make you feel as though you can progress through the story quickly and easily.

 

 

Guitar Notes

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guitar notes

Guitar Notes

by: Mary Amato

It’s always enjoyable to find an author who’s not well known by and to have the book you uncover be so enthralling that you can’t seem to forget about it or put it down. The chapters are in a pattern alternating between the two main characters, Tripp Broody and Lyla Marks, despite this neither the book nor the story is confusing. The chapters are short and sweet in their nature but it’s hard to tell whether the book takes place in middle school or high school. It is both existential and innocent in nature. Going along with the title, there is actual music involved and written lyrics tied to pitches and notes that express the character’s feelings. The songs are more like poems within the text but they would be more entertaining for someone with musical experience/knowledge. Also, there is a website name included in the book for anyone who actually wants to hear the songs performed. Take note parents of teens who seem more interested in music than reading- recommend this book to your teen, they are sure to be delighted.

 

Weekly Reads

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Candace- The Roman Guide to Slave Management

Christine- The Family Romanov:Murder, Rebellion, and the Fall of Imperial Russia

Jeanne- The Victorian City: Everyday Life in Dickens’ London

Meghan- Julie & Julia

Shianne-  Don’t Even Think About It

Sue- And The Mountains Echoed

Weekly Reads

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Candace- Secret Lives of the Tsars:Three Centuries of Autocracy, Debauchery, Betrayal, Murder, and Madness from Romanov Russia

Christine- Four:A Divergent Collection

Meghan- Outlander

Sue- Last to Know

 

Landline

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landlineLandline

By: Rainbow Rowell

Torn between work and a failing marriage, Georgie stays home for Christmas while her husband Neil brings the children to visit his parents in Omaha. When she uses her mother’s landline phone, she manages to reach her husband… in the past. Can Georgie fix her marriage before it begins? And, more importantly… should she?

            Landline was a fun, easy read, with a lot of heart. Most of the book’s charm lies in how well-written the characters are. I felt like I knew Georgie and everyone around her. The story is told partly in the present, and partly through flashbacks. This made the story interesting, because while the present storyline unfolds, you are also finding out about how Georgie and Neil met and fell in love. It was a light read, with humor throughout. Georgie’s problems were serious, but the book was never too heavy or depressing. This would be a great book to bring on vacation, or to curl up with on a rainy day.

Plus One

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17934493Plus One
By: Elizabeth Fama

Plus One takes place in a world where the population is divided between “Rays,” who must live and work during the day, and “Smudges,” who can only can only go outside at night. A Smudge named Sol Le Cour breaks curfew in order to kidnap her niece, a Ray, so her terminally ill grandfather can hold her before he dies. She enlists the help of a Ray, D’Arcy Benoît, and the two fall deeply in love. Will their divided world tear them apart?

Plus One is a beautifully written novel about family, society, and two star-crossed lovers who never should have met. It has undertones that reflect on society, and how people perceive success and happiness. The book’s inside flap bills it as a love story, but there are some deeper issues present. Familial love is at least as important to the plot as romantic love. Unfortunately, this deeper content was just skimmed at the surface, you never really dive in. But there is an interesting commentary on poverty and social status, and you don’t have to look too hard to find it. Plus One was a page-turner, and I read it in less than a day. There was plenty of action and romance to move the plot along, and I was really interested to see what would happen next. It is a good book for teens (especially girls), and it is well-written and imaginative.

Weekly Reads

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See what your favorite library staff members are reading!

Candace- Living Hell:The Dark Side of the Civil War

Christine- I Work at a Public Library:A Collection of Crazy Stories from the Stacks

Jeanne- Sisters of Treason

Meghan- An Abundance of Katherines

Shianne- W.I.T.C.H.:Stolen Spring